Episode 49: Classroom Management – An Interview with Dr. Ross Green part 2

In this episode I continue the interview on Collaborative Problem Solving in the classroom with Dr. Ross Green, author of The Explosive Child. As I stated in the previous episode, there are a variety of classroom management techniques, all designed to help solve the issue of how to discipline children who are having behavioral problems. I think you’ll find that Dr. Green’s approach makes a lot of sense and it can be implemented in the classroom as well as at home. A fascinating interview.


Here again are the resources on this topic that I think you’ll find useful:

Collaborative Problem Solving Books and DVDs


Related Episodes on The Psych Files



Episode 48: Classroom Management – An Interview with Dr. Ross Green

Classroom management techniques – there are a lot of strategies for dealing with behavior problems in the classroom. It’s time to add Collaborative Problem Solving to your toolkit. Learn an alternative to traditional classroom discipline techniques like timeout or sending the child to the principal. A recent Time magazine article entitled “How to Make Great Teachers” mentions that in a 2001 survey of teachers, 44% listed "student behavior problems" as the reason they left the profession. What can be done?


In this episode I interview Dr. Ross Green, author of The Explosive Child and the upcoming book "Lost in School". He’ll tell you how to use collaborative problem solving with your students. This episode is also for parents, daycare workers, babysitters – anyone who wants to help young people learn to think their way through everyday behavior problems.

(If I sound like the “chipmunks” on your computer, try this link instead.)

Collaborative Problem Solving Books and DVDs


Related Episodes on The Psych Files


Episode 23: Do Teachers Have to be Actors in the Classroom Today?

We often heard it said that teachers have to be actors today in order to keep the attention of today’s low attention span students. Well, in this episode I agree that teachers and actors do think alike in many ways – but not in the ways most people think. Join me as I explore how teachers and actors think alike in terms of objectives, obstacles, “raising the stakes”, and getting feedback from other actors/students.


Resources for this episode